Hesi Underground

Ask me anything   Submit   Dreaming in Color: Art and Inspirations by Hesi Glowacki ~Beautiful things are not the subject of terms, it’s our observations, the perception… I am a stream of rushing river. I am a history of broken stone. I am great hope. I am form and matter. I am a source of energy. I am pure energy. I am the light sublunary. I am great wit’ all of my parts Ka Ach Ba! I am Me, Myself and I. I am aware. I am the conscious and the subconscious. I am the sincerest heart… I am love. The Prescene. Unity Divided. Me and I. Ka Ach Ba.
I am a creative who utilizes some medium that is at my disposal to translate my messages and the words are all weapons in my artistic arsenal...
My principal interests: African American literature and art, esp. Harlem Renaissance, African poetry and art, African and African American culture and art, ethnic art, primitive cultures, but also LGBT writing and art, independent film and musical stylings, Ancient Kemetic Culture, Nubian Culture; global human rights, including LGBTQ rights. Instagram #hesiunderground KIK: hesiunderground http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/hesi-glowacki.html  http://www.saatchiart.com/hesi artfinder.com/hesiglowacki

Trinidadian artist Boscoe Holder (1921 – 2007) was the consummate Renaissance man. He led a celebrated artistic life as painter, dancer, costume designer, choreographer, dance instructor at the University of the West Indies, leader of an international dance group for nearly twenty years, band leader, and pianist.

Holder began playing the piano at age five, and by his seventh birthday he had begun painting, self-taught. As a teenager, enamoured of his island’s culture, he researched and learned the local dances and songs, and by the late nineteen-thirties he had formed a group of dancers and was producing shows depicting theatricalised versions of these songs and dances of Trinidad. At the same time he gave several solo art exhibits, and became a founder and life member of the Trinidad Art Society.

Boscoe’s work, although it drew on European styles of painting, always depicted his people and place and its culture. He often painted his dancers and musicians, and his interest in dance was inspired much more by local folk and African dance and ritual and music.

Boscoe Holder painted a large number of  dynamic male nudes, boasting a deft spontaneity and fluid sensuality. Not exhibited during his lifetime,  apparently, they were painted purely for the artist’s pleasure.

As the images here make clear, the best of Holder’s paintings fall into two categories: portraits of members of his family, and erotically-charged paintings of naked men. What these bodies of work have in common is the evident pleasure the artist takes in appearances, in light, in color, in the act of looking and in his ability to make a likeness available to us through the magic of paint. What distinguishes the two bodies of work from each other—apart from their divergence of subject matter and the different feelings of intimacy that this gives rise to—is the separate methods of their making. Each portrait is closely observed, carefully constructed, and concerned with the character of the individual subject. The nudes are different. They look effortless, spontaneous, dreamy. What gives them their expressive force, and what acts as a vehicle for the ardor with which they are suffused, is the untroubled manner of the artist’s approach; the paint is applied swiftly and without apparent revision, making the paintings urgent and carefree.

Many of Holder’s paintings are unsigned and undated. In the captions above, we’ve assembled whatever information was available about the paintings.

On the Chaise, acrylic, 8 x 10 inches, 1995

Asleep, acrylic, 8,5 x 11,5 inches, 1995

Green Background, acrylic, 19,5 x 15,5 inches, 1996

Trini White Cap, acrylic, no date

Portrait, acrylic, 19,25 x 15,5 inches, 2001

Upright, acrylic, 19,5 x 15,75 inches, 1996

Male Nude Study, acrylic

Male Nude, acrylic, 23 x 17,5 inches, 1991

Posed, acrylic, 15,5 x 18,75 inches, c. 1990

Male Nude Model, acrylic on canvasette, 24 x 20 inches, unsigned

— 1 day ago with 5 notes
#Boscoe Holder  #Arthur Aldwyn Holder  #Trinidad and Tobago  #contemporary painter  #Caribbean Art  #Art  #painting  #figurative painting  #male nude  #male portrait  #gay  #gay art  #artist  #Trinidadian artist  #visual artist  #dance  #choreographer  #gay men  #Black Gay Art  #Port-of-Spain  #gay artist  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #101 Art Gallery 
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"An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he might choose."
 - Langston Hughes, "The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain" (1926).
— 1 day ago with 4 notes
#Langston Hughes  #The Harlem Renaissance  #The New Negro  #The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain  #poet  #novelist  #playwright  #African American  #American Poet  #African American Poet  #quote  #quotes 
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"Know the world in yourself. Never look for yourself in the world, for this would be to project your illusion"
 ~ Kemetic Proverb  (Karnak Temple)
— 5 days ago with 4 notes
#Ancient Egyptian Proverbs  #Ancient Egypt  #Kemetism  #kemetic  #quote  #proverb  #Karnak Temple 
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“ I create for that innocent little boy in the balcony who has come to the theatre for the first time, he wants to see magic, so I want to give him magic.”

Afro-Cuban dance sequence by Geoffrey Holder, from the movie Carib Gold (1956).Filmed in Key West, Florida.

 

— 1 week ago with 4 notes
#Carib Gold  #movie  #dance  #maritime themed  #Voo Doo Dancer  #Voo Doo  #VooDoo  #Geoffrey Holder  #dancer  #artist  #Trinidadian actor  #Trinidadian artist  #dance routine  #Afro-Cuban  #Key West  #quote 
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"I paint a slice of life, whatever it is that day."

Young Man by Geoffrey Holder, mixed media, 16 x 12 inches, 2000

Portrait of Geoffrey Holder, in costume, posing as if dancing by Carl Van Vechten

— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#Geoffrey Holder  #artist  #painter  #dancer  #choreographer  #trinidadian artist  #Trinidadian actor  #Trinidadian  #designer  #actor  #singer  #painting  #Trinidadian artist  #Carl Van Vechten  #art 
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A Single Instant Of Belief by Léon-Gontran Damas

For a moment believe
in a hand without a glove
a hand luminous springtime
naked in the birth of spring
springtime born from magic
magic of rhythm
the toothless
diseased mob
single-eyed and paranoid
cried all over
my insane heart without hate

Pigments, translated by Alex Wilder

Léon-Gontran Damas was the first published author of the three Négritude founders. Pigments, a book of poems, was published in 1937 with a preface by Robert Desnos, a renowned French surrealist poet. Pigments is considered the Négritude manifesto. It passionately condemns racism, slavery, and assimilation.

Flemish artist Franz Masereel’s woodcut for the first edition of Pigments depicts a black man in a city bursting forth from a tuxedo, a symbol of the constraining pomp and elitism of Western culture. His nakedness, the palm trees, and the black figures are meant to represent the essence of blackness, or Négritude. They can also be seen as reinforcing the stereotype of primitivism associated with Africans.

Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library.

— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#Léon-Gontran Damas  #French poet  #politician  #Négritude movement  #Négritude  #Negritude  #poem  #poetry  #poet  #Lionel Georges André Cabassou  #Guyana  #French Guyana  #African Literature  #Black Brown & Beige: Surrealist Writings from Africa and the Diaspora  #Pigments  #Schomburg Center  #Franz Masereel  #Négritude manifesto  #racism  #slavery  #assimilation  #a book of poems  #Leon-Gontran Damas  #a literary and ideological movement  #1930  #The Harlem Renaissance 
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I Have Walked a Long Time by Sonia Sanchez

i have walked a long time
much longer than death that splinters
wid her innuendos.
my life, ah my alien life,
is like an echo of nostalgia
bringen blue screens to bury clouds
rinsen wite stones stretched among the sea.

you, man, will you remember me when i die?
will you stare and stain my death and say
i saw her dancen among swallows
far from the world’s obscenities?
you, man, will you remember and cry?

and i have not loved.
always
while the body prowls
the soul catalogues each step;
while the unconscious unbridles feasts
the flesh knots toward the shore.
ah, i have not loved
wid legs stretched like stalks against sheets
wid stomachs drainen the piracy of oceans
wid mouths discarden the gelatin
to shake the sharp self.
i have walked by memory of others
between the blood night
and twilights
i have lived in tunnels
and fed the bloodless fish;
between the yellow rain
and ash,
i have heard the rattle
of my seed,
so time, like some pearl necklace embracen
a superior whore, converges
and the swift spider binds my breast.

you, man, will you remember me when i die?
will you stare and stain my death and say
i saw her applauden suns
far from the grandiose audience?
you, man, will you remember and cry?

poem from Homegirls and Handgrenades (White Pine Press, 2007)
poem also part of Full Moon of Sonia CD

image

— 3 weeks ago
#Sonia Sanchez  #poet  #poem  #poetry  #African American  #African American Writer  #African American Poet  #activist  #playwright  #Full Moon of Sonia  #I Have Walked a Long Time  #American Poet  #Black Arts Movement  #American Women's poetry 
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Carnival by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 20x24 inches, 2013

Carnival by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 20x24 inches, 2013

— 4 weeks ago with 28 notes
#Carnival  #Hesi Glowacki  #painter  #painting  #acrylic on canvas  #abstract  #abstract art  #abstract expressionism  #contemporary  #contemporary art  #artist  #artists on tumblr  #artfinder  #saatchi  #fineartamerica  #fine art 
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Creation by AARON DOUGLAS (1899 - 1979)  Oil on canvas board, 1969. 508x406 mm; 20x16 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right.  Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Daniels, Nashville, TN.  Exhibited: Aaron Douglas: A Private View Selections from the Daniels Collection, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN, October 24, 2003 – February 1, 2004; Berry-Hill Gallery, New York, with the label on the frame back.  This striking oil painting is an unusual example of a foray into abstraction by Aaron Douglas. Douglas had never completely crossed into abstraction like his peers Charles Alston and Hale Woodruff despite a modernist sensibility and his use of elements of Cubist design and geometric abstraction in his early painting. The concentric circles and tonal patterns Douglas employed as early as 1926 were innovative and strong indicators of his formal concerns. The earliest and best known example of his painterly abstraction is found in the oil on canvas, Birds in Flight, 1927. In 1973 Douglas recalled to David Driskell how “I wanted to create something new and modern that fitted in with Art Deco and the other things that were taking the country by storm. That is how I came upon the notion to use a number of things such as Cubism and a style with straight lines to emphasize the mathematical relationship of things.” Kinshasha Holman Conwill in her Frist Center exhibition essay points out that “though these smaller-scale paintings lack the monumentality of Douglas’s better-known murals, they affirm his enduring attraction to geometric abstraction.” In 1969, while Douglas had been retired from Fisk University for three years, he continued to paint and exhibit his artwork.

Creation by AARON DOUGLAS (1899 - 1979) 
Oil on canvas board, 1969. 508x406 mm; 20x16 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right.

Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Daniels, Nashville, TN. 
Exhibited: Aaron Douglas: A Private View Selections from the Daniels Collection, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN, October 24, 2003 – February 1, 2004; Berry-Hill Gallery, New York, with the label on the frame back.

This striking oil painting is an unusual example of a foray into abstraction by Aaron Douglas. Douglas had never completely crossed into abstraction like his peers Charles Alston and Hale Woodruff despite a modernist sensibility and his use of elements of Cubist design and geometric abstraction in his early painting. The concentric circles and tonal patterns Douglas employed as early as 1926 were innovative and strong indicators of his formal concerns. The earliest and best known example of his painterly abstraction is found in the oil on canvas, Birds in Flight, 1927. In 1973 Douglas recalled to David Driskell how “I wanted to create something new and modern that fitted in with Art Deco and the other things that were taking the country by storm. That is how I came upon the notion to use a number of things such as Cubism and a style with straight lines to emphasize the mathematical relationship of things.” Kinshasha Holman Conwill in her Frist Center exhibition essay points out that “though these smaller-scale paintings lack the monumentality of Douglas’s better-known murals, they affirm his enduring attraction to geometric abstraction.” In 1969, while Douglas had been retired from Fisk University for three years, he continued to paint and exhibit his artwork.

— 1 month ago with 3 notes
#Aaron Douglas  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #artist  #art  #African American artist  #African American  #African Artist  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #Swann Galleries  #Abstract Composition  #abstract expressionism  #abstract  #painting  #cubism  #Creation 
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Your World by Georgia Douglas Johnson

Your world is as big as you make it.
I know, for I used to abide
In the narrowest nest in a corner,
My wings pressing close to my side.

But I sighted the distant horizon
Where the skyline encircled the sea
And I throbbed with a burning desire
To travel this immensity.

I battered the cordons around me
And cradled my wings on the breeze,
Then soared to the uttermost reaches
With rapture, with power, with ease!

— 1 month ago with 3 notes
#Georgia Douglas Johnson  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #poet  #poetry  #writer  #writing  #african american poet  #American Poet  #African American Poet  #Black Poetry  #playwright  #Fiction Writer  #African-American female poets  #Female Poet  #literature  #african american studies  #American Renaissance  #World Literature 
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Two Male Torsos, c. 1940 (black ‘African Torso’ and white ‘Untitled’) by Richmond Barthe, plaster composition with painted finish, White male verso inscribed, 13 H x 2 1/2 W x 3 D, base; 1/4 H x 3 1/2 W x 3 1/2 D, black male not inscribed, 12 1/2 H x 4 W x 2 1/2 D, base; 1 H x 3 1/4 W x 3 1/4 D

Mississippi - born artist Richmond Barthe (January 28, 1901 – March 5, 1989) was a pioneer in American Sculpture. A graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, he was a notable artist of the Harlem Renaissance and winner of many awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship. Barthe’s career had begun to flourish in the early 30’s and he was considered to be one of the leading ‘Moderns’ of the time, today his pieces are featured in leading museums such as the Whitney Museum of American art as well as the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of his most recognized American public works ‘Rose McClendon’ is installed at Frank Lloyd Wright designed, Fallingwater House in Western Pennsylvania.

— 1 month ago with 14 notes
#Richmond Barthé  #Richmond Barthe  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #gay artist  #gay art  #art  #sculpture  #sculptor  #male torso  #African American  #African American artist  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #James Richmond Barthé  #artist  #american artist  #Whitney Museum of American Art  #Metropolitan Museum of Art  #Pennsylvania Museum of Art  #Virginia Museum of Fine Arts  #LGBT African Americans  #LGBT 
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Luz Del Sol by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 31 inches, 2014

Luz Del Sol by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 31 inches, 2014

— 1 month ago with 7 notes
#Hesi Glowacki  #Luz Del Sol  #abstract  #abstraction  #abstract impressionism  #abstract expressionism  #lyrical abstraction  #contemporary art  #contemporary  #London artist  #London Art  #inspiration  #creative  #cubism 
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Untitled by Norman Lewis, oil on canvas, 1955. 635x1270 mm; 25x50 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right. 

 This nocturnal abstraction is a very good example of Norman Lewis’s important “black” paintings. Beginning in the late 1940s, Lewis painted at night, depicting what he saw from his studio window or on walks in Harlem. His 1950s “atmospheric” works, such as Orpheus from 1953 and this untitled painting, subsume the drawing and abstracted structures under the dark surface of “blackness.” These darker paintings are a counterpoint to his more celebrated works at the time, the lighter, ephemeral Migrating Birds of 1954 and Harlem Turns White of 1955. Another such “black” 1955 painting, Dark Horizon, was included in the 1995 Studio Museum in Harlem exhibition, Norman Lewis, Black Paintings, 1946-1977.

Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Oral Lovell, Wellesley, MA; thence by descent to the current owner. Oral Lovell was a significant collector of Norman Lewis’s works and was his close friend from 1959 to 1965. They met through a circle of New York City artists, including Romare Bearden and Charles Alston.

Untitled by Norman Lewis, oil on canvas, 1955. 635x1270 mm; 25x50 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right.

This nocturnal abstraction is a very good example of Norman Lewis’s important “black” paintings. Beginning in the late 1940s, Lewis painted at night, depicting what he saw from his studio window or on walks in Harlem. His 1950s “atmospheric” works, such as Orpheus from 1953 and this untitled painting, subsume the drawing and abstracted structures under the dark surface of “blackness.” These darker paintings are a counterpoint to his more celebrated works at the time, the lighter, ephemeral Migrating Birds of 1954 and Harlem Turns White of 1955. Another such “black” 1955 painting, Dark Horizon, was included in the 1995 Studio Museum in Harlem exhibition, Norman Lewis, Black Paintings, 1946-1977.

Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Oral Lovell, Wellesley, MA; thence by descent to the current owner. Oral Lovell was a significant collector of Norman Lewis’s works and was his close friend from 1959 to 1965. They met through a circle of New York City artists, including Romare Bearden and Charles Alston.

— 1 month ago
#Norman Lewis  #Norman W. Lewis  #African American artist  #African American  #african-american  #African-American Painter  #teacher  #scholar  #Spiral group  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #black art  #Black Art  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance 
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Untitled (Abstract Composition) by Norman Lewis, oil on wood panel, 1947. 335x457 mm; 14x18 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right recto. Signed and inscribed.

By the fall of 1946, Lewis had begun a new series of urban abstracted forms, as found in Metropolitan Crowd in the Delaware Art Museum, and Twilight Sounds, 1947, in the St. Louis Museum of Art. This horizontal band of densely drawn figures is similar in composition to his paintings Crossing and his second Jazz Musicians, both of 1948, with their suggested Cubism.

Untitled (Abstract Composition) by Norman Lewis, oil on wood panel, 1947. 335x457 mm; 14x18 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right recto. Signed and inscribed.

By the fall of 1946, Lewis had begun a new series of urban abstracted forms, as found in Metropolitan Crowd in the Delaware Art Museum, and Twilight Sounds, 1947, in the St. Louis Museum of Art. This horizontal band of densely drawn figures is similar in composition to his paintings Crossing and his second Jazz Musicians, both of 1948, with their suggested Cubism.

— 1 month ago with 1 note
#Norman Lewis  #African-American painter  #African American artist  #teacher  #scholar  #abstract expressionism  #Norman W. Lewis  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral group  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #art  #artist  #artwork  #american art  #abstraction 
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In the manner of Rockwell Kent and his African American contemporaries working in the 1930s, this remarkable scene depicts a nude black male figure, overcome by a vision of angels — also black — in the nighttime sky. As in many of Kent’s and Marsden Hartley’s paintings, the landscape scene probably refers to the mountains of Maine. 

Looking Heavenward, oil on board, 23,75 x 27,05 inches, circa 1930s

In the manner of Rockwell Kent and his African American contemporaries working in the 1930s, this remarkable scene depicts a nude black male figure, overcome by a vision of angels — also black — in the nighttime sky. As in many of Kent’s and Marsden Hartley’s paintings, the landscape scene probably refers to the mountains of Maine.

Looking Heavenward, oil on board, 23,75 x 27,05 inches, circa 1930s

— 1 month ago with 14 notes
#Looking Heavenward  #Rockwell Kent  #Marsden Hartley  #African American  #black male  #nude male  #Maine  #art  #painting  #1930s  #1930  #african  #African Male  #modern art  #artwork  #oil painting  #oil on board 
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