Hesi Underground

Ask me anything   Submit   Art and Words: Hesi Glowacki notebook ~Beautiful things are not the subject of terms, it’s our observations, the perception… I am a stream of rushing river. I am a history of broken stone. I am great hope. I am form and matter. I am a source of energy. I am pure energy. I am the light sublunary. I am great wit’ all of my parts Ka Ach Ba! I am Me, Myself and I. I am aware. I am the conscious and the subconscious. I am the sincerest heart… I am love. The Prescene. Unity Divided. Me and I. Ka Ach Ba.
I am a creative who utilizes some medium that is at my disposal to translate my messages and the words are all weapons in my artistic arsenal...
My principal interests: African American literature and art, esp. Harlem Renaissance, African poetry and art, African and African American culture and art, ethnic art, primitive cultures, but also LGBT writing and art, independent film and musical stylings, Ancient Kemetic Culture, Nubian Culture; global human rights, including LGBTQ rights. Instagram #hesiunderground KIK: hesiunderground http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/hesi-glowacki.html  http://www.saatchiart.com/hesi

“I’m intensely interested in space, form, color, the things that challenge all contemporary artists. It would be wonderful if I could just sit back and do it esthetically. But, I have to react to the other thing. I’m part of it, I have no choice. I think I’ve gotten to the point where it isn’t satisfying to do another handsome, decorative abstraction. Painting has become so impersonal. I have a need to relate to humanity in a more direct way.”

African Theme # 1 by Charles Alston, oil on canvas, circa 1950 (First in African Theme series)
African Theme #2 by Charles Alston, 36.12 X 27 in (91.74 X 68.58 cm), oil on canvas, circa 1950
Untitled (African Theme) by Charles Alston, oil on canvas. 20 x 16 in., circa 1952

— 11 hours ago with 1 note
#Charles Alston  #Charles Henry Alston  #Charles H. Alston  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #art  #artist  #artwork  #abstract  #abstract figurative  #abstraction  #spiral  #Spiral group  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #muralist  #teacher  #painter  #oil on canvas  #oil painting  #illustrator  #sculptor  #black art  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #african american  #African American  #African Theme 2  #African Theme  #Untitled (African Theme) 
Dreams by Paul Laurence Dunbar

What dreams we have and how they fly
 Like rosy clouds across the sky;
           Of wealth, of fame, of sure success,
           Of love that comes to cheer and bless;
 And how they wither, how they fade,
 The waning wealth, the jilting jade —
          The fame that for a moment gleams,
           Then flies forever, —dreams, ah —dreams!

 O burning doubt and long regret
 O tears with which our eyes are wet,
           Heart-throbs, heart-aches, the glut of pain,
           The somber cloud, the bitter rain,
 You were not of those dreams — ah! well,
 Your full fruition who can tell?
           Wealth, fame, and love, ah! love that beams
           Upon our souls, all dreams — ah! dreams.

— 3 days ago with 9 notes
#Dreams by Paul Laurence Dunbar  #Dreams  #Paul Lawrence Dunbar  #poet  #poem  #poetry  #African American  #African-American poet  #novelist  #playwright  #Negro dialect  #Black Writers  #American poet  #African-American poets 
An artist is he who can balance strong contrasts, who can combine opposing forms and forces in significant unity.Real art demands the intense purity and wholeness of the very materials we artists often irresponsibly mutilate. One must become a man before he can be an artist.For above a single talent I prize a multiformed man. Art is a means of communicating high-rate vibrations.
Essentials: Timeless Truths for Living in Today’s World, chapter XLV by Jean Toomer

A timeless collection of aphorisms by the acclaimed author of Cane, one of the most important books of the twentieth century, Essentials challenges us to consider our search for wholeness and connection with one another in an age of fragmentation, alienation, and exploitation. Destined to become a cult classic, it is inspired by Toomer’s study under Gurdjieff and framed by a unique blending of Eastern spirituality and modern psychology. It includes reflections on topics ranging from the dangers of an industrial (and technological) age to the failure of modern religious and educational institutions. Above all, the brilliance set forth in Essentials affirms Toomer’s position as America’s true African American pioneering genius.

An artist is he who can balance strong contrasts, who can combine opposing forms and forces in significant unity.
Real art demands the intense purity and wholeness of the very materials we artists often irresponsibly mutilate.
One must become a man before he can be an artist.
For above a single talent I prize a multiformed man.
Art is a means of communicating high-rate vibrations.

Essentials: Timeless Truths for Living in Today’s World, chapter XLV by Jean Toomer

A timeless collection of aphorisms by the acclaimed author of Cane, one of the most important books of the twentieth century, Essentials challenges us to consider our search for wholeness and connection with one another in an age of fragmentation, alienation, and exploitation. Destined to become a cult classic, it is inspired by Toomer’s study under Gurdjieff and framed by a unique blending of Eastern spirituality and modern psychology. It includes reflections on topics ranging from the dangers of an industrial (and technological) age to the failure of modern religious and educational institutions. Above all, the brilliance set forth in Essentials affirms Toomer’s position as America’s true African American pioneering genius.

— 2 weeks ago
#Essentials: Timeless Truths for Living in Today's World  #Jean Toomer  #Essentials  #Essentials: Definitions and Aphorisms  #modern psychology  #Eastern spirituality  #American poet  #novelist  #African American  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #meditation  #aphorism  #Cane  #Black Writers  #affirmation  #philosophy 
RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992) Untitled (Figure with Still Life).  Gouache and pastel crayons on wove paper, circa 1950-55. 600x480 mm; 23 5/8x18 7/8 inches.  Provenance: Gift from the artist; private New York collection. 

RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992)
Untitled (Figure with Still Life).

Gouache and pastel crayons on wove paper, circa 1950-55. 600x480 mm; 23 5/8x18 7/8 inches.

Provenance: Gift from the artist; private New York collection. 

— 3 weeks ago with 1 note
#Ronald Joseph  #artist  #muralist  #printmaker  #painter  #American  #American Artist  #African American  #Afro-American Artists  #abstract  #Abstract Composition  #abstract expressionism  #Untitled (Figure with Still Life)  #Gouache and pastel crayons on wove paper  #gouache  #pastel 
RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992) Untitled (Cubist Composition).  Gouache and charcoal on cream laid paper, circa 1951-3. 600x470 mm; 23 3/4x17 5/8 inches.  Provenance: the artist; collection of Adrienne E. Wheeler; private collection, New Jersey. 

RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992)
Untitled (Cubist Composition).

Gouache and charcoal on cream laid paper, circa 1951-3. 600x470 mm; 23 3/4x17 5/8 inches.

Provenance: the artist; collection of Adrienne E. Wheeler; private collection, New Jersey. 

— 3 weeks ago
#Ronald Joseph  #art  #painter  #muralist  #printmaker  #African American  #Afro-American Artists  #Black Art  #artist  #gouche  #charcoal  #Abstract Composition  #Untitled (Cubist Composition)  #Swann Galleries  #abstract art  #abstract expressionism  #American Artist 
RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992) Untitled (Cubist Composition).  Gouache and charcoal on cream laid paper, circa 1951-3. 600x470 mm; 23 3/4x17 5/8 inches.  Provenance: the artist; collection of Adrienne E. Wheeler; private collection, New Jersey.  As he worked closely with his friend, Bob Blackburn, the two artists’ works have often been confused, especially their early abstract work made in Paris in the early 1950s. Blackburn and Joseph befriended each other when they both were studying lithography under Reva Helfond at the Harlem Community Art Center in 1939. 

RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992)
Untitled (Cubist Composition).

Gouache and charcoal on cream laid paper, circa 1951-3. 600x470 mm; 23 3/4x17 5/8 inches.

Provenance: the artist; collection of Adrienne E. Wheeler; private collection, New Jersey.

As he worked closely with his friend, Bob Blackburn, the two artists’ works have often been confused, especially their early abstract work made in Paris in the early 1950s. Blackburn and Joseph befriended each other when they both were studying lithography under Reva Helfond at the Harlem Community Art Center in 1939. 

— 3 weeks ago
#Ronald Joseph  #Untitled (Cubist Composition)  #Gouache and charcoal on cream laid paper  #Bob Blackburn  #Afro-American Artists  #African American  #Black Art  #Abstract Composition  #abstract  #abstract art  #abstract expressionism  #American Artist  #cubism  #cubist  #art  #artist  #Gouache and charcoal  #Swann Galleries 
RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992) Untitled (Abstract Figures).  Crayon and pastel on wove paper, circa 1950-55. 514x387 mm; 20 1/4x15 1/4 inches, full margins. Signed in crayon, lower right.  Provenance: private collection.
Ronald Joseph, painter, printmaker, muralist, was born in 1910 on St. Kitts, in the West Indies. With the benefit of scholarships he was educated in New York at the Ethical Culture School, Fieldston School and Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. In the company of Robert Blackburn, he studied printmaking with Riva Helfond at the Harlem Arts Center where he also served as a teacher. He was a participant in the mural section of the WPA and a representative of the Harlem Artists’ Guild to the New York Worlds Fair (1939-1940). Joseph enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps at the declaration of World War II and was posted as a member of the ground crew at Tuskegee, Alabama, and in Michigan. After the war he was awarded a Rosenwald Fellowship, permitting him to travel and live in Peru for two years. Joseph used the G.l. bill to study in Paris at the Grande Chaumière. He resides in Brussels where he continues to work as a painter.

RONALD JOSEPH (1910 - 1992)
Untitled (Abstract Figures).

Crayon and pastel on wove paper, circa 1950-55. 514x387 mm; 20 1/4x15 1/4 inches, full margins. Signed in crayon, lower right.

Provenance: private collection.

Ronald Joseph, painter, printmaker, muralist, was born in 1910 on St. Kitts, in the West Indies. With the benefit of scholarships he was educated in New York at the Ethical Culture School, Fieldston School and Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. In the company of Robert Blackburn, he studied printmaking with Riva Helfond at the Harlem Arts Center where he also served as a teacher. He was a participant in the mural section of the WPA and a representative of the Harlem Artists’ Guild to the New York Worlds Fair (1939-1940). Joseph enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps at the declaration of World War II and was posted as a member of the ground crew at Tuskegee, Alabama, and in Michigan. After the war he was awarded a Rosenwald Fellowship, permitting him to travel and live in Peru for two years. Joseph used the G.l. bill to study in Paris at the Grande Chaumière. He resides in Brussels where he continues to work as a painter.

— 3 weeks ago
#Ronald Joseph  #African American  #American Artist  #The Harlem Renaissance  #painter  #printmaker  #muralist  #Harlem Renaissance  #abstract  #abstract expressionism  #Abstract Composition  #Untitled (Abstract Figures)  #art  #artist  #Afro-American Artists 
If you bring forth what is within you, what youbring forth will save you. If you do not bring forth what iswithin you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you.
 - The Gospel of Thomas

If you bring forth what is within you, what you
bring forth will save you. If you do not bring forth what is
within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you.

 - The Gospel of Thomas

— 4 weeks ago with 4 notes
#The Gospel of Thomas  #Early Christianity  #Gospel of Thomas  #Gospel of Thomas Collection  #gospel  #Egypt  #non-canonical sayings-gospel  #oral gospel traditions  #Nag Hammadi library  #Nag Hammadi  #coptic  #The Coptic-Language text  #Self  #Ego  #Itself  #quote  #quotes  #saying  #Thomas saying 70  #Thomas verse 70 

I’m always chasing rainbows
Watching clouds drifting by
My schemes are just like all my dreams
Ending in the sky

Some fellows look and find the sunshine
I always look and find the rain
Some fellows make a winning sometime
I never even make a gain, believe me

I’m always chasing rainbows
Waiting to find a little bluebird in vain

Some fellows look and find the sunshine
But I always look and find the rain
Some fellows make a winning sometime
I never even make a gain, believe me

I’m always chasing rainbows
Waiting to find a little bluebird someday

— 1 month ago
#Sammy Davis Jr.  #Harry Carroll  #I'm Always Chasing Rainbows  #Jazz  #Jazz Music  #Jazz Vocal  #Jazz Singer  #Joseph McCarthy  #Fantaisie-Impromptu by Frédéric Chopin  #Samuel George Sammy Davis Jr.  #Music  #music video  #musician 
Still Life (abstract with flowers) by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on paper, 16,5 x 23,4 inches, 2014, Private Collection

Still Life (abstract with flowers) by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on paper, 16,5 x 23,4 inches, 2014, Private Collection

— 1 month ago with 14 notes
#Still Life  #Still Life (abstract with flowers)  #Hesi Glowacki  #painter  #painting  #acrylic on paper  #Naive Art  #folk art  #abstract art  #folk  #Naïve art  #art  #flowers  #private collection 
Still Life with Fetish by Wilmer Jennings, 1938, wood engraving, 17” x 21” framed, Courtesy Kenkeleba Gallery

Wilmer Jennings was painter, printmaker, designer, educator, and jeweler, was born in 1910 in Atlanta, where, during the Depression, he was a member of the WPA/FAP. He studied at Morehouse College, Atlanta, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1931 under the guidance of Hale Woodruff. He has studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, in Providence, where he lived and worked up until his death in 1990.

Wilmer Jennings Born Atlanta, Georgia, 1910 B.S., Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia, 1933 Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island, 1940s Jewelry Designer, Imperial Pearl, Rhode Island, 1948-1979 Died 1990 Major ExhibitionsBlack Printmakers and the W.P.A., The Lehman College Art Gallery, Bronx, New York, 1989Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation, Newark Museum, New Jersey, 1989Alone in a Crowd: Prints of the 1930s by African-American Artists; From the Collection of Reba and Dave Williams, American Federation of the Arts, 1993

Still Life with Fetish by Wilmer Jennings, 1938, wood engraving, 17” x 21” framed, Courtesy Kenkeleba Gallery

Wilmer Jennings was painter, printmaker, designer, educator, and jeweler, was born in 1910 in Atlanta, where, during the Depression, he was a member of the WPA/FAP. He studied at Morehouse College, Atlanta, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1931 under the guidance of Hale Woodruff. He has studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, in Providence, where he lived and worked up until his death in 1990.

Wilmer Jennings
Born Atlanta, Georgia, 1910
B.S., Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia, 1933
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island, 1940s
Jewelry Designer, Imperial Pearl, Rhode Island, 1948-1979
Died 1990 
Major Exhibitions
Black Printmakers and the W.P.A., The Lehman College Art Gallery, Bronx, New York, 1989
Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation, Newark Museum, New Jersey, 1989
Alone in a Crowd: Prints of the 1930s by African-American Artists; From the Collection of Reba and Dave Williams, American Federation of the Arts, 1993

— 1 month ago with 2 notes
#Wilmer Jennings  #painter  #printmaker  #desinger  #educator  #jeweler  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #art  #Black Art  #African American  #American Artist  #1920s  #20th-century American painters  #Still Life with Fetish  #Still Life with Fetish by Wilmer Jennings  #Courtesy Kenkeleba Gallery 
In the early 1960s in New York, the artist Romare Bearden invited a group of African-American artists to meet and discuss their roles as black artists during the charged years of the Civil Rights movement. On July 5th, 1963, the group decided to form a collective and called themselves Spiral. The name was inspired by the Archimedean spiral, which moves outward embracing all directions, yet constantly upward.
The group included artists Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Calvin Douglass, Perry Ferguson, Reginald Gammon, Felrath Hines, Alvin Hollingsworth, Norman Lewis, Earl Miller, William Majors, Richard Mayhew, Merton D. Simpson, Hale Woodruff and James Yeargans. The only woman invited to join the group was Emma Amos. The artists met regularly to discuss aesthetics, black identity in a mostly white art world, and the matter of responsibility to the community versus artistic freedom. While almost all of the artists had begun their careers with figural work, many were interested in exploring abstraction while continuing to address issues of race, and the urgent social concerns of the day. It was during the Spiral period that Bearden developed his technique of collage, combining photographs of African masks and faces with subject matter from the African-American community. The group organized an exhibition in which each member had to submit work in black and white. The exhibition was a success, but the group members eventually moved apart and on to other concerns.
Their first group exhibition, at the Christopher Street location in 1964, consisted of all black and white works. The second and last complete group exhibition was at the Long Island University’s Brooklyn campus. A small brochure was created for both venues. 

The purpose of the Spiral Group was not for African American artists to devise ways to gain entry into the allusive gallery system. The collective met for the purpose of exchanging meaningful dialogue on art, the Black aesthetic, world views, the lack of exhibition opportunities and space; respond to critical reviews by the uninterested art world establishment and how to be supportive of each other’s efforts and craft.

In the early 1960s in New York, the artist Romare Bearden invited a group of African-American artists to meet and discuss their roles as black artists during the charged years of the Civil Rights movement. On July 5th, 1963, the group decided to form a collective and called themselves Spiral. The name was inspired by the Archimedean spiral, which moves outward embracing all directions, yet constantly upward.

The group included artists Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Calvin Douglass, Perry Ferguson, Reginald Gammon, Felrath Hines, Alvin Hollingsworth, Norman Lewis, Earl Miller, William Majors, Richard Mayhew, Merton D. Simpson, Hale Woodruff and James Yeargans. The only woman invited to join the group was Emma Amos. The artists met regularly to discuss aesthetics, black identity in a mostly white art world, and the matter of responsibility to the community versus artistic freedom. While almost all of the artists had begun their careers with figural work, many were interested in exploring abstraction while continuing to address issues of race, and the urgent social concerns of the day. It was during the Spiral period that Bearden developed his technique of collage, combining photographs of African masks and faces with subject matter from the African-American community. The group organized an exhibition in which each member had to submit work in black and white. The exhibition was a success, but the group members eventually moved apart and on to other concerns.

Their first group exhibition, at the Christopher Street location in 1964, consisted of all black and white works. The second and last complete group exhibition was at the Long Island University’s Brooklyn campus. A small brochure was created for both venues. 

The purpose of the Spiral Group was not for African American artists to devise ways to gain entry into the allusive gallery system. The collective met for the purpose of exchanging meaningful dialogue on art, the Black aesthetic, world views, the lack of exhibition opportunities and space; respond to critical reviews by the uninterested art world establishment and how to be supportive of each other’s efforts and craft.

— 1 month ago with 7 notes
#Spiral Group  #Spiral  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #James Yeargans  #Romare Bearden  #Hale A. Woodruff  #Hale Woodruff  #Norman Lewis  #Richard Mayhew  #Charles Alston  #Reginald Gammon  #Emma Amos  #Calvin Douglass  #Perry Ferguson  #Felrath Hines  #Merton D. Simpson  #Earl Miller  #William Majors  #African-American artists  #African American  #American Artist  #art  #art collective  #artist  #Civil Rights movement  #black identity  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Black Art