Hesi Underground

Ask me anything   Submit   Beautiful things are not the subject of terms, it’s our observations, the perception… I am a stream of rushing river. I am a history of broken stone. I am great hope. I am form and matter. I am a source of energy. I am pure energy. I am the light sublunary. I am great wit’ all of my parts Ka Ach Ba! I am Me, Myself and I. I am aware. I am the conscious and the subconscious. I am the sincerest heart… I am love. The Prescene. Unity Divided. Me and I. Ka Ach Ba.
I am a creative who utilizes some medium that is at my disposal to translate my messages and the words are all weapons in my artistic arsenal...
My principal interests: African American literature and art, esp. Harlem Renaissance, African poetry and art, African and African American culture and art, ethnic art, primitive cultures, but also LGBT writing and art, independent film and musical stylings, Ancient Kemetic Culture, Nubian Culture; global human rights, including LGBTQ rights. Instagram #hesiunderground KIK: hesiunderground http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/hesi-glowacki.html  http://www.saatchiart.com/hesi

Still Life with Fetish by Wilmer Jennings, 1938, wood engraving, 17” x 21” framed, Courtesy Kenkeleba Gallery

Wilmer Jennings was painter, printmaker, designer, educator, and jeweler, was born in 1910 in Atlanta, where, during the Depression, he was a member of the WPA/FAP. He studied at Morehouse College, Atlanta, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1931 under the guidance of Hale Woodruff. He has studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, in Providence, where he lived and worked up until his death in 1990.

Wilmer Jennings Born Atlanta, Georgia, 1910 B.S., Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia, 1933 Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island, 1940s Jewelry Designer, Imperial Pearl, Rhode Island, 1948-1979 Died 1990 Major ExhibitionsBlack Printmakers and the W.P.A., The Lehman College Art Gallery, Bronx, New York, 1989Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation, Newark Museum, New Jersey, 1989Alone in a Crowd: Prints of the 1930s by African-American Artists; From the Collection of Reba and Dave Williams, American Federation of the Arts, 1993

Still Life with Fetish by Wilmer Jennings, 1938, wood engraving, 17” x 21” framed, Courtesy Kenkeleba Gallery

Wilmer Jennings was painter, printmaker, designer, educator, and jeweler, was born in 1910 in Atlanta, where, during the Depression, he was a member of the WPA/FAP. He studied at Morehouse College, Atlanta, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1931 under the guidance of Hale Woodruff. He has studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, in Providence, where he lived and worked up until his death in 1990.

Wilmer Jennings
Born Atlanta, Georgia, 1910
B.S., Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia, 1933
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island, 1940s
Jewelry Designer, Imperial Pearl, Rhode Island, 1948-1979
Died 1990 
Major Exhibitions
Black Printmakers and the W.P.A., The Lehman College Art Gallery, Bronx, New York, 1989
Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation, Newark Museum, New Jersey, 1989
Alone in a Crowd: Prints of the 1930s by African-American Artists; From the Collection of Reba and Dave Williams, American Federation of the Arts, 1993

— 1 day ago with 2 notes
#Wilmer Jennings  #painter  #printmaker  #desinger  #educator  #jeweler  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #art  #Black Art  #African American  #American Artist  #1920s  #20th-century American painters  #Still Life with Fetish  #Still Life with Fetish by Wilmer Jennings  #Courtesy Kenkeleba Gallery 
In the early 1960s in New York, the artist Romare Bearden invited a group of African-American artists to meet and discuss their roles as black artists during the charged years of the Civil Rights movement. On July 5th, 1963, the group decided to form a collective and called themselves Spiral. The name was inspired by the Archimedean spiral, which moves outward embracing all directions, yet constantly upward.
The group included artists Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Calvin Douglass, Perry Ferguson, Reginald Gammon, Felrath Hines, Alvin Hollingsworth, Norman Lewis, Earl Miller, William Majors, Richard Mayhew, Merton D. Simpson, Hale Woodruff and James Yeargans. The only woman invited to join the group was Emma Amos. The artists met regularly to discuss aesthetics, black identity in a mostly white art world, and the matter of responsibility to the community versus artistic freedom. While almost all of the artists had begun their careers with figural work, many were interested in exploring abstraction while continuing to address issues of race, and the urgent social concerns of the day. It was during the Spiral period that Bearden developed his technique of collage, combining photographs of African masks and faces with subject matter from the African-American community. The group organized an exhibition in which each member had to submit work in black and white. The exhibition was a success, but the group members eventually moved apart and on to other concerns.
Their first group exhibition, at the Christopher Street location in 1964, consisted of all black and white works. The second and last complete group exhibition was at the Long Island University’s Brooklyn campus. A small brochure was created for both venues. 

The purpose of the Spiral Group was not for African American artists to devise ways to gain entry into the allusive gallery system. The collective met for the purpose of exchanging meaningful dialogue on art, the Black aesthetic, world views, the lack of exhibition opportunities and space; respond to critical reviews by the uninterested art world establishment and how to be supportive of each other’s efforts and craft.

In the early 1960s in New York, the artist Romare Bearden invited a group of African-American artists to meet and discuss their roles as black artists during the charged years of the Civil Rights movement. On July 5th, 1963, the group decided to form a collective and called themselves Spiral. The name was inspired by the Archimedean spiral, which moves outward embracing all directions, yet constantly upward.

The group included artists Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Calvin Douglass, Perry Ferguson, Reginald Gammon, Felrath Hines, Alvin Hollingsworth, Norman Lewis, Earl Miller, William Majors, Richard Mayhew, Merton D. Simpson, Hale Woodruff and James Yeargans. The only woman invited to join the group was Emma Amos. The artists met regularly to discuss aesthetics, black identity in a mostly white art world, and the matter of responsibility to the community versus artistic freedom. While almost all of the artists had begun their careers with figural work, many were interested in exploring abstraction while continuing to address issues of race, and the urgent social concerns of the day. It was during the Spiral period that Bearden developed his technique of collage, combining photographs of African masks and faces with subject matter from the African-American community. The group organized an exhibition in which each member had to submit work in black and white. The exhibition was a success, but the group members eventually moved apart and on to other concerns.

Their first group exhibition, at the Christopher Street location in 1964, consisted of all black and white works. The second and last complete group exhibition was at the Long Island University’s Brooklyn campus. A small brochure was created for both venues. 

The purpose of the Spiral Group was not for African American artists to devise ways to gain entry into the allusive gallery system. The collective met for the purpose of exchanging meaningful dialogue on art, the Black aesthetic, world views, the lack of exhibition opportunities and space; respond to critical reviews by the uninterested art world establishment and how to be supportive of each other’s efforts and craft.

— 4 days ago with 6 notes
#Spiral Group  #Spiral  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #James Yeargans  #Romare Bearden  #Hale A. Woodruff  #Hale Woodruff  #Norman Lewis  #Richard Mayhew  #Charles Alston  #Reginald Gammon  #Emma Amos  #Calvin Douglass  #Perry Ferguson  #Felrath Hines  #Merton D. Simpson  #Earl Miller  #William Majors  #African-American artists  #African American  #American Artist  #art  #art collective  #artist  #Civil Rights movement  #black identity  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Black Art 

"A Study of Negro Artists" (c. 1932), the 15 minute motion picture was filmed by Jules V.D. Bucher. The project was funded by the Harmon Foundation and screened at the New York Public Library to raise funds to save the Harlem Art Workshop.In creating A Study of Negro Artists, the Harmon Foundation hoped to educate the American public about the rich African American arts scene developing in New York City.

The film is an example of the New Negro Arts movement associated with the Harlem Renaissance. It also exemplifies the tendency to segregate artistic achievement according to perceived racial differences.

 The documentary covers some important visual artists during the Harlem Renaissance: Richmond Barthe, noted sculptor (in particular, large outdoor work); James Latimer Allen, noted portrait photographer (known particularly for documenting the Harlem Renaissance); Aaron Douglas, one the major painters of the era; Palmer Hayden, another prolific painter; and Augusta Savage, the leading female sculptor of the movement. While this film doesn’t tell much about them, many African American artists made their living during the day, mostly working blue collar jobs, while working on their art in their off hours. We do however get to see them in their studios and examples of their work.

— 4 days ago with 1 note
#The New Negro Art  #The New Negro  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #A Study of Negro Artists  #Jules V.D. Bucher  #Harmon Foundation  #African American  #James Latimer Allen  #Aaron Douglas  #Palmer Hayden  #Augusta Savage  #Richmond Barthé  #Richmond Barthe  #movie  #art  #artist  #Black Art  #American Artist 
Celestial Gate by Hale Woodruff (1900 - 1980) Oil on canvas, circa 1968. 912x610 mm; 36x24 inches. Signed in oil, lower right. Signed and titled in ink on the stretcher bars verso.   Exhibited: Hale Woodruff 50 Years of His Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, April 29 - June 24, 1979, with the printed label on the painting back.  This series incorporates the forms derived from Ashanti gold weights and the doors of dwellings of Dogon chiefs in Mali. There is some debate about the date of this series as the artist did not date his work and the characteristics appear in paintings dating as early as 1946, continuing into the 1960s. The recent Spelman College exhibition dated some Celestial Gate paintings 1950-53. However, in this case, the artist’s letter to the owner gives us a much clearer indication that he continued this series well into the 1960s.

Celestial Gate by Hale Woodruff (1900 - 1980) 

Oil on canvas, circa 1968. 912x610 mm; 36x24 inches. Signed in oil, lower right. Signed and titled in ink on the stretcher bars verso. 
 
Exhibited: Hale Woodruff 50 Years of His Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, April 29 - June 24, 1979, with the printed label on the painting back. 

This series incorporates the forms derived from Ashanti gold weights and the doors of dwellings of Dogon chiefs in Mali. There is some debate about the date of this series as the artist did not date his work and the characteristics appear in paintings dating as early as 1946, continuing into the 1960s. The recent Spelman College exhibition dated some Celestial Gate paintings 1950-53. However, in this case, the artist’s letter to the owner gives us a much clearer indication that he continued this series well into the 1960s.

— 4 days ago with 1 note
#Celestial Gate  #Hale A. Woodruff  #Hale Aspacio Woodruff  #Hale Woodruff  #art  #artist  #American Artist  #Black Art  #African American  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #painting  #oil on canvas  #Hale Woodruff 50 Years of His Art  #The Studio Museum in Harlem 
"It’s very important to keep your artistic level at the highest possible range of development and yet make your work convey a telling quality in terms of what we are as people." — Hale Woodruff, quoted in Albert Murray et al., Hale Woodruff : 50 Years of His Art (New York: The Studio Museum in Harlem, 1979)
Hale Woodruff: 50 Years of His Art; Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held April 29 - June 24, 1979. Introduction by Romare Bearden. With text by Winifred Stoelting, Mary Schmidt Campbell, and Gylbert Coker. Includes an interview between Albert Murray and Woodruff. With chronology, exhibition, award, and collection history, bibliography, and checklist of the exhibition. With 16 full-color plates in addition to black-and-white illustrations throughout the text.

"It’s very important to keep your artistic level at the highest possible range of development and yet make your work convey a telling quality in terms of what we are as people." — Hale Woodruff, quoted in Albert Murray et al., Hale Woodruff : 50 Years of His Art (New York: The Studio Museum in Harlem, 1979)

Hale Woodruff: 50 Years of His Art; Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held April 29 - June 24, 1979. Introduction by Romare Bearden. With text by Winifred Stoelting, Mary Schmidt Campbell, and Gylbert Coker. Includes an interview between Albert Murray and Woodruff. With chronology, exhibition, award, and collection history, bibliography, and checklist of the exhibition. With 16 full-color plates in addition to black-and-white illustrations throughout the text.

— 4 days ago
#Hale Woodruff: 50 Years of His Art  #Hale A. Woodruff  #Hale Aspacio Woodruff  #Hale Woodruff  #art  #artist  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #painter  #American Artist  #Black Art  #quotes  #book  #The Studio Museum in Harlem 
Enigmatic Figure II by Hale Woodruff, charcoal, 28 x 22 inches (71.12 x 55.88 cm), circa 1970, private Washington, DC collection; thence by descent to a public charity.

Enigmatic Figure II by Hale Woodruff, charcoal, 28 x 22 inches (71.12 x 55.88 cm), circa 1970, private Washington, DC collection; thence by descent to a public charity.

— 4 days ago with 12 notes
#Enigmatic Figure II  #Hale Woodruff  #painting  #charcoal  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #private collection  #art  #artist  #African American  #American Artist  #painter  #Black Art 
Seated Male Model with Mustache, ca. 1939 - 1940, by William H. Johnson, tempera on paper 24 1/8 x 18 1/8 in. (61.2 x 46.0 cm); Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation

Seated Male Model with Mustache, ca. 1939 - 1940, by William H. Johnson, tempera on paper 24 1/8 x 18 1/8 in. (61.2 x 46.0 cm); Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation

— 4 days ago with 2 notes
#Seated Male Model with Mustache  #William H. Johnson  #William Henry Johnson  #Naive Art  #American Artist  #african - american  #Black Art  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #art  #artwork  #painting  #tempera on paper  #Smithsonian American Art Museum  #Harmon Foundation  #male  #male nude 
Male Model in Chair, ca. 1939 - 1940 by William H. Johnson, tempera on paper 24 1/8 x 18 1/8 in. (61.2 x 46.0 cm); Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation

Male Model in Chair, ca. 1939 - 1940 by William H. Johnson, tempera on paper 24 1/8 x 18 1/8 in. (61.2 x 46.0 cm); Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation

— 4 days ago with 1 note
#Male Model in Chair  #Naive Art  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #William H. Johnson  #William Henry Johnson  #Smithsonian American Art Museum  #Harmon Foundation  #tempera on paper  #artwork  #painting  #male nude  #male  #Black Art 
"My aim is to express in a natural way what I feel, what is in me, both rhythmically and spiritually, all that which in time has been saved up in my family of primitiveness and tradition, and which is now concentrated in me."
William H. Johnson, 1932
— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#William Henry Johnson  #William H. Johnson  #quote  #African American  #American painter  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #art 
Essentials is the perfect collection of daily meditations for both the soul and the intellect, full of affirmation and wisdom for the times in which we live. This edition of Essentials is the first trade edition of the book. Presented in a compact format, it is full of insight as relevant to today’s confusing and contradictory lives as when it was first written.Privately published by Jean Toomer in 1931 in an edition of 300 copies, Essentials is a timely, timeless collection of aphorisms by the acclaimed author of Cane, one of the most important books of the 20th century. Toomer reflects on topics ranging from the spiritual dangers of industrial society to the failures of modern religious and educational institutions. At the time he produced these maxims, Toomer was engrossed in study with Russian mystic and psychologist G.I. Gurdjieff, who devised a complex blending of Eastern religion and modern psychology. In his accompanying biographical essay, Rudolph Byrd provides background on Toomer’s life and the philosophical assumptions that inform his writing, thus providing important context both for those familiar with Toomer and those new to his work. Essentials explores many of the same themes that emerge in Cane: the modern search for wholeness, connection, and resolution in an age of fragmentation, alienation, and exploitation.

Essentials is the perfect collection of daily meditations for both the soul and the intellect, full of affirmation and wisdom for the times in which we live. This edition of Essentials is the first trade edition of the book. Presented in a compact format, it is full of insight as relevant to today’s confusing and contradictory lives as when it was first written.Privately published by Jean Toomer in 1931 in an edition of 300 copies, Essentials is a timely, timeless collection of aphorisms by the acclaimed author of Cane, one of the most important books of the 20th century. Toomer reflects on topics ranging from the spiritual dangers of industrial society to the failures of modern religious and educational institutions. At the time he produced these maxims, Toomer was engrossed in study with Russian mystic and psychologist G.I. Gurdjieff, who devised a complex blending of Eastern religion and modern psychology. In his accompanying biographical essay, Rudolph Byrd provides background on Toomer’s life and the philosophical assumptions that inform his writing, thus providing important context both for those familiar with Toomer and those new to his work. Essentials explores many of the same themes that emerge in Cane: the modern search for wholeness, connection, and resolution in an age of fragmentation, alienation, and exploitation.

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#Essentials: Definitions and Aphorisms  #Essentials  #Jean Toomer  #aphorism  #definition  #writer  #Black Writers  #African American  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #book 

A literary masterpiece of the Harlem Renaissance, Cane is a powerful work of innovative fiction evoking black life in the South. The sketches, poems, and stories of black rural and urban life that make up Cane are rich in imagery. Visions of smoke, sugarcane, dusk, and flame permeate the Southern landscape: the Northern world is pictured as a harsher reality of asphalt streets. Impressionistic, sometimes surrealistic, the pieces are redolent of nature and Africa, with sensuous appeals to eye and ear.

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

— 1 week ago with 8 notes
#Jean Toomer  #Cane  #African American  #writer  #poet  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #novel  #modernism  #Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library  #Yale University 
The Eyes of My Regret written by Angelina W. Grimke (1880-1958)

Always at dusk, the same tearless experience,
The same dragging of feet up the same well-worn path
To the same well-worn rock;
The same crimson or gold dropping away of the sun
The same tints, - rose, saffron, violet, lavender, grey
Meeting, mingling, mixing mistily;
Before me the same blue black cedar rising jaggedly to 
a point;
Over it, the same slow unlidding of twin stars,
Two eyes, unfathomable, soul-searing,
Watching, watching, watching me;
The same two eyes that draw me forth, against my will
dusk after dusk;
The same two eyes that keep me sitting late into the
night, chin on knees
Keep me there lonely, rigid, tearless, numbly
miserable -
The eyes of my Regret.

— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#African-American  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #poetry  #poet  #jurnalist  #writer  #Black Writers  #playwright  #Angelina Weld Grimké  #Angelina Weld Grimke  #poem  #lesbian writer 
I belong to the universeI belong to the water of chaos because I am a Water-Carrierbecause I am ku-ur-kuI am aquatic, extraterrestrial blueI am the one who comes into beingfrom water and in the water my soul is pure as cosmos!I belong to the universeAquarius!
Aquarius by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on paper, 16,5 x 23,4 inches, 2014

I belong to the universe
I belong to the water of chaos
because I am a Water-Carrier
because I am ku-ur-ku
I am aquatic, extraterrestrial blue
I am the one who comes into being
from water and in the water
my soul is pure as cosmos!
I belong to the universe
Aquarius!

Aquarius by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on paper, 16,5 x 23,4 inches, 2014

— 1 week ago with 12 notes
#aquarius  #universe  #cosmos  #art  #painting  #acrylic on paper  #Hesi Glowacki  #poetry  #poem  #artwork  #Fauvism  #Naive Art  #male  #male nude  #abstract  #aquarius constellation  #planets  #symbols  #cosmological