Hesi Underground

Ask me anything   Submit   Beautiful things are not the subject of terms, it’s our observations, the perception… I am a stream of rushing river. I am a history of broken stone. I am great hope. I am form and matter. I am a source of energy. I am pure energy. I am the light sublunary. I am great wit’ all of my parts Ka Ach Ba! I am Me, Myself and I. I am aware. I am the conscious and the subconscious. I am the sincerest heart… I am love. The Prescene. Unity Divided. Me and I. Ka Ach Ba.
I am a creative who utilizes some medium that is at my disposal to translate my messages and the words are all weapons in my artistic arsenal...
My principal interests: African American literature and art, esp. Harlem Renaissance, African poetry and art, African and African American culture and art, ethnic art, primitive cultures, but also LGBT writing and art, independent film and musical stylings, Ancient Kemetic Culture, Nubian Culture; global human rights, including LGBTQ rights. Instagram #hesiunderground KIK: hesiunderground http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/hesi-glowacki.html  http://www.saatchiart.com/hesi

"My aim is to express in a natural way what I feel, what is in me, both rhythmically and spiritually, all that which in time has been saved up in my family of primitiveness and tradition, and which is now concentrated in me."
William H. Johnson, 1932
— 1 day ago with 2 notes
#William Henry Johnson  #William H. Johnson  #quote  #African American  #American painter  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #art 
Essentials is the perfect collection of daily meditations for both the soul and the intellect, full of affirmation and wisdom for the times in which we live. This edition of Essentials is the first trade edition of the book. Presented in a compact format, it is full of insight as relevant to today’s confusing and contradictory lives as when it was first written.Privately published by Jean Toomer in 1931 in an edition of 300 copies, Essentials is a timely, timeless collection of aphorisms by the acclaimed author of Cane, one of the most important books of the 20th century. Toomer reflects on topics ranging from the spiritual dangers of industrial society to the failures of modern religious and educational institutions. At the time he produced these maxims, Toomer was engrossed in study with Russian mystic and psychologist G.I. Gurdjieff, who devised a complex blending of Eastern religion and modern psychology. In his accompanying biographical essay, Rudolph Byrd provides background on Toomer’s life and the philosophical assumptions that inform his writing, thus providing important context both for those familiar with Toomer and those new to his work. Essentials explores many of the same themes that emerge in Cane: the modern search for wholeness, connection, and resolution in an age of fragmentation, alienation, and exploitation.

Essentials is the perfect collection of daily meditations for both the soul and the intellect, full of affirmation and wisdom for the times in which we live. This edition of Essentials is the first trade edition of the book. Presented in a compact format, it is full of insight as relevant to today’s confusing and contradictory lives as when it was first written.Privately published by Jean Toomer in 1931 in an edition of 300 copies, Essentials is a timely, timeless collection of aphorisms by the acclaimed author of Cane, one of the most important books of the 20th century. Toomer reflects on topics ranging from the spiritual dangers of industrial society to the failures of modern religious and educational institutions. At the time he produced these maxims, Toomer was engrossed in study with Russian mystic and psychologist G.I. Gurdjieff, who devised a complex blending of Eastern religion and modern psychology. In his accompanying biographical essay, Rudolph Byrd provides background on Toomer’s life and the philosophical assumptions that inform his writing, thus providing important context both for those familiar with Toomer and those new to his work. Essentials explores many of the same themes that emerge in Cane: the modern search for wholeness, connection, and resolution in an age of fragmentation, alienation, and exploitation.

— 2 days ago with 1 note
#Essentials: Definitions and Aphorisms  #Essentials  #Jean Toomer  #aphorism  #definition  #writer  #Black Writers  #African American  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #book 

A literary masterpiece of the Harlem Renaissance, Cane is a powerful work of innovative fiction evoking black life in the South. The sketches, poems, and stories of black rural and urban life that make up Cane are rich in imagery. Visions of smoke, sugarcane, dusk, and flame permeate the Southern landscape: the Northern world is pictured as a harsher reality of asphalt streets. Impressionistic, sometimes surrealistic, the pieces are redolent of nature and Africa, with sensuous appeals to eye and ear.

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

— 2 days ago with 7 notes
#Jean Toomer  #Cane  #African American  #writer  #poet  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #novel  #modernism  #Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library  #Yale University 
The Eyes of My Regret written by Angelina W. Grimke (1880-1958)

Always at dusk, the same tearless experience,
The same dragging of feet up the same well-worn path
To the same well-worn rock;
The same crimson or gold dropping away of the sun
The same tints, - rose, saffron, violet, lavender, grey
Meeting, mingling, mixing mistily;
Before me the same blue black cedar rising jaggedly to 
a point;
Over it, the same slow unlidding of twin stars,
Two eyes, unfathomable, soul-searing,
Watching, watching, watching me;
The same two eyes that draw me forth, against my will
dusk after dusk;
The same two eyes that keep me sitting late into the
night, chin on knees
Keep me there lonely, rigid, tearless, numbly
miserable -
The eyes of my Regret.

— 3 days ago with 2 notes
#African-American  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #poetry  #poet  #jurnalist  #writer  #Black Writers  #playwright  #Angelina Weld Grimké  #Angelina Weld Grimke  #poem  #lesbian writer 
I belong to the universeI belong to the water of chaos because I am a Water-Carrierbecause I am ku-ur-kuI am aquatic, extraterrestrial blueI am the one who comes into beingfrom water and in the water my soul is pure as cosmos!I belong to the universeAquarius!
Aquarius by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on paper, 16,5 x 23,4 inches, 2014

I belong to the universe
I belong to the water of chaos
because I am a Water-Carrier
because I am ku-ur-ku
I am aquatic, extraterrestrial blue
I am the one who comes into being
from water and in the water
my soul is pure as cosmos!
I belong to the universe
Aquarius!

Aquarius by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on paper, 16,5 x 23,4 inches, 2014

— 1 week ago with 11 notes
#aquarius  #universe  #cosmos  #art  #painting  #acrylic on paper  #Hesi Glowacki  #poetry  #poem  #artwork  #Fauvism  #Naive Art  #male  #male nude  #abstract  #aquarius constellation  #planets  #symbols  #cosmological 
The Gathering of Heka

This recitation is to be memorized and repeated as an oath and dedication to the practise of Heka. It is most effective as a sort of mantra, and as such should be spoken in the Egyptian, rather than English. The translation is given only to elucidate the meaning of the spell.

This spell is from Chapter 24 of the Papyrus of Ani, the "Chapter of Gaining Power."

Nuk Tem-Khepera kheper t’esef her uart mut-f.
Ertau unsu en ami Nu, behennu en amiu t’at’at.
Ask temt-na heka pen entef, kher se entef kher-f, betenu er thesem, khak er sut.
A anen makhent ent Ra!
Rut aqi-k em mehit em khent-ek er Se-mesert em neter-khert.
Ask temt-na heka pen em bu neb enti-f, kher se entef kher-f, betenu er thesem, khak er sut.
Arit kheperu em ertu mut em qemam-tu neteru em sekeru.
Erta-entu mut seref en neteru.
Ask erta-na heka apen kher enti-f betenu er thesem, khak er sut, khak er sut.

TRANSLATION:  ”I am the uncreated god. Before me the dwellers in chaos are dogs, their chiefs merely wolves. I gather the power from every place, from every person, faster than light itself. Hail to he in the heavens who is strong even before the terror of the darkness. He gathers the power from every place, from every person, faster than light itself. He restores the giver of life. He creates the gods from silence alone and comforts them. He bestows upon me this power from every place, faster than the shadow follows the light.”

Heka represents the operation + awareness of unseen forces, aka Magik. The name translates to “activation of the Ka” in the Kemetic language. The ka is the vitality/life force/chi responsible for materialization of psychic as well as physical matter. In Kemet, there was no distinction between science + religion, so the study + use of chemicals (khem-heka ”black magik”).

— 1 week ago
#Papyrus of Ani  #spell  #Magic  #Ancient Egypt  #The Gathering of Heka  #Chapter 24  #neteru  #ancient magic  #Heka  #Kemetism  #kemetic magic  #Ka  #Chapter of Gaining Power 
Untitled by Gavin Janjtes, South Africa, 1990; National Museum of African Art collection

Untitled by Gavin Janjtes, South Africa, 1990; National Museum of African Art collection

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#Gavin Janjtes  #untitled  #universe  #African Cosmos  #South Africa  #art  #artist  #South African artist  #National Museum of African Art  #neteru  #Magic  #night sky 

The ancient Egyptians believed in many different gods and goddesses. Each one with their own role to play in maintaining peace and harmony across the land.

Some gods and goddesses took part in creation, some brought the flood every year, some offered protection, and some took care of people after they died. Others were either local gods who represented towns, or minor gods who represented plants or animals.

"Guide me through the shadows of night, Challenge me in the dark, Guard me when I cannot guard myself, Open the ways of my heart(…)”

— 1 week ago with 32 notes
#Ancient Egypt  #gods  #egyptian gods  #magic  #goddesse  #quote  #Egyptian Hieroglyphs  #egyptian magic 
The Northern [Bottom] and Southern [Top] Panel ‘Decan Chart’ from the Tomb of Senmut [c 1500 BC]. [In reality this panel is about 4 m long.]
This is the earliest Egyptian ‘decan chart,’ that appears on a tomb, rather than inside a coffin. It is also the first ‘decan chart’ that has associated planets. The two left hand figures in the boats in the south panel have been identified by Egyptologists as representing what we would now call the planets Saturn and Jupiter.
The figure in the boat next to the them is the star we now call Sirius, but for the Ancient Egyptians was related to Isis. As always in the decan system, she is occupying the 36th and last decan. [The decans read right to left.] The decans follow the fairly standard order seen in decans dating back to their first known instance in the Egyptian record around 2100 BC in the Middle Kingdom.
However, it should be noted that Saturn and Jupiter are not located in decans, i.e. the decans are not being used by the Egyptians to record the position of Saturn and Jupiter in particular places in the heavens, as the Zodiac Signs in a modern astrology chart would be used to do for planets. This is a later Babylonian idea that was still a thousand years in the future.
The decan system was actually used as a clock for time keeping in the night hours and through the year - modern Egyptologists call them Egyptian sidereal clocks.
The Star of Osiris. As an example of how our modern mind set imposes concepts on the Ancients take the example of Osiris. You can find written frequently that he’s associated with the constellation Orion. In fact, the ancient Egyptians believed that the stars of the sky represented the bas of individual souls, i.e. one star meant one soul. Deities were associated with the heavens, but only with single stars, such as, as mentioned above, Isis with the star we now call Sirius.
In the Senmuts tomb, for example, Osiris is associated with the star known as hr rmn s3hu, a star under the arm of what we would now call Orion. Other stars in what we call Orion are associated with the god Horus or with Horus’ children.

The Northern [Bottom] and Southern [Top] Panel ‘Decan Chart’ from the Tomb of Senmut [c 1500 BC]. [In reality this panel is about 4 m long.]

This is the earliest Egyptian ‘decan chart,’ that appears on a tomb, rather than inside a coffin. It is also the first ‘decan chart’ that has associated planets. The two left hand figures in the boats in the south panel have been identified by Egyptologists as representing what we would now call the planets Saturn and Jupiter.

The figure in the boat next to the them is the star we now call Sirius, but for the Ancient Egyptians was related to Isis. As always in the decan system, she is occupying the 36th and last decan. [The decans read right to left.] The decans follow the fairly standard order seen in decans dating back to their first known instance in the Egyptian record around 2100 BC in the Middle Kingdom.

However, it should be noted that Saturn and Jupiter are not located in decans, i.e. the decans are not being used by the Egyptians to record the position of Saturn and Jupiter in particular places in the heavens, as the Zodiac Signs in a modern astrology chart would be used to do for planets. This is a later Babylonian idea that was still a thousand years in the future.

The decan system was actually used as a clock for time keeping in the night hours and through the year - modern Egyptologists call them Egyptian sidereal clocks.

The Star of Osiris. As an example of how our modern mind set imposes concepts on the Ancients take the example of Osiris. You can find written frequently that he’s associated with the constellation Orion. In fact, the ancient Egyptians believed that the stars of the sky represented the bas of individual souls, i.e. one star meant one soul. Deities were associated with the heavens, but only with single stars, such as, as mentioned above, Isis with the star we now call Sirius.

In the Senmuts tomb, for example, Osiris is associated with the star known as hr rmn s3hu, a star under the arm of what we would now call Orion. Other stars in what we call Orion are associated with the god Horus or with Horus’ children.

— 1 week ago with 13 notes
#Senmuts tomb  #decan chart  #Ancient Egypt  #Egypt  #egyptian magic  #cosmology  #cosmos  #cosmic creation powers  #Zodiac  #signs and zodiac  #star map  #astronomical ceiling in the tomb of Senenmut  #Magic 
Sufis (Islamic mystics) form an important element in Islamic society. The author provides an explanation of their mystical doctrine and practice. He also discusses recognizing pious and holy mystics as saints and the value of their intercession on behalf of believers. The text stresses the practice of the Tijaniyah order of Sufis. Displayed is a diagram explaining the religious life of the mystics, which revolves around the teaching of their master.
al-Hajj Umar ibn Said al-Futi. Rimah Hizb al-Rahim ‘ala Nuhuri Hizb al-Rajim (The Spear of the Merciful against the Throat of the Reviled), copied 1858. Loaned by the Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library, Timbuktu, Mali

Sufis (Islamic mystics) form an important element in Islamic society. The author provides an explanation of their mystical doctrine and practice. He also discusses recognizing pious and holy mystics as saints and the value of their intercession on behalf of believers. The text stresses the practice of the Tijaniyah order of Sufis. Displayed is a diagram explaining the religious life of the mystics, which revolves around the teaching of their master.

al-Hajj Umar ibn Said al-Futi. Rimah Hizb al-Rahim ‘ala Nuhuri Hizb al-Rajim (The Spear of the Merciful against the Throat of the Reviled), copied 1858. Loaned by the Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library, Timbuktu, Mali

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#al-Hajj Umar ibn Sa'id Tal  #Umar Futi  #El Hadj Umar Tall  #Senegalese  #Mali  #Timbuktu  #Islamic scholar  #Islamic mystics  #sufism  #Islamic Saints  #diagram  #magic  #mystic  #mystical doctrine  #Africa  #African Cosmos 
"I don’t want realism. I want magic! Yes, yes, magic! I try to give that to people. I misrepresent things to them. I don’t tell the truth, I tell what ought to be the truth. And it that’s sinful, then let me be damned for it!"
― Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire
— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#A Streetcar Named Desire  #Tennessee Williams  #quote  #book 
Self Portrait with folk paper cuts by Hesi Glowacki, mixed media on canvas, 12x10 inches, 2013
 

Self Portrait with folk paper cuts by Hesi Glowacki, mixed media on canvas, 12x10 inches, 2013


 

(Source: hesiunderground)

— 1 week ago with 28 notes
#Hesi Glowacki  #folk  #art  #traditional  #paper cuts  #canvas  #oil  #oil on canvas  #mixed media  #acrylic  #Self Portrait  #male  #male portrait 
"…And the one who had a revelation spoke: people must know exactly where they are standing and where they are going, so they don’t get lost!!!"
— 2 weeks ago with 2 notes
#Hesi Glowacki  #quotes  #saying