Hesi Underground

Ask me anything   Submit   Beautiful things are not the subject of terms, it’s our observations, the perception… I am a stream of rushing river. I am a history of broken stone. I am great hope. I am form and matter. I am a source of energy. I am pure energy. I am the light sublunary. I am great wit’ all of my parts Ka Ach Ba! I am Me, Myself and I. I am aware. I am the conscious and the subconscious. I am the sincerest heart… I am love. The Prescene. Unity Divided. Me and I. Ka Ach Ba.
I am a creative who utilizes some medium that is at my disposal to translate my messages and the words are all weapons in my artistic arsenal...
My principal interests: African American literature and art, esp. Harlem Renaissance, African poetry and art, African and African American culture and art, ethnic art, primitive cultures, but also LGBT writing and art, independent film and musical stylings, Ancient Kemetic Culture, Nubian Culture; global human rights, including LGBTQ rights. Instagram #hesiunderground

Dawn by Gladys May Casely-Hayford alias Aquah Laluah

Dawn for the rich, the artistic and the
     wise,
 Is beauty splashed on canvas of the skies,
 The brushes being the clouds that float
     the blue,
 Dipped in the breeze for paint, and washed
     by dew.

But dawn to those who bathe the night in
     tears,
 Squeeze sustenance from hard unyielding
     years,
 Is full of strange imaginings and fears.
 The dawn renews the terror of the day
 Where harassing uncertainties hold sway;
 And pain held in surcease through brief
     hours of rest
 Roars up its head in its unceasing quest
 To wear out body, brain and mind and soul
 Till death is a resolve, and death a goal.
 For those life holds no beauty, dawn no
     light,
 For day is hopeless, dawn is struck with
     blight.

 

Gladys May Casely-Hayford alias Aquah Laluah (11 May 1904, Axim - October 1950, Freetown) was a Sierra Leonean writer, daughter of Adelaide Casely-Hayford. She started the Krio language literature.

She studied in Ghana and Wales, danced with a Berlin jazz band, and returning to Africa taught at her mother’s Girls’ Vocational School in Freetown. Her first poems were published in the Atlantic Monthly and The Philadelphia Tribune. Her poetry has been widely anthologized.

Hayford was an accomplished writer, musician, dramatist, painter, and storyteller. She had very deep African roots in her writings and Anthologists of the Harlem Renaissance loved her work.  She was an influential poet during that period because she wasn’t afraid to be herself, and express herself through her writing.

— 3 days ago with 3 notes

#Gladys May Casely-Hayford  #Aquah Laluah  #Sierra Leone  #Ghana  #African writer  #The Harlem Renaissance  #poet  #writer  #lesbian writer  #an influential poet  #poetry  #African poetry  #Adelaide Casely-Hayford  #Krio language literature  #Krio 
The mask of light by Pavel Tchelitchew, gouache on paper, 1934, paper size 25⅜” x 19⅝” (64.5 x 50 cm.), Museum of Modern Art, NY. To the latter part of 1933 belong three portraits of the African dancer, Feral Benga, among them The Mask of Light.

The mask of light by Pavel Tchelitchew, gouache on paper, 1934, paper size 25⅜” x 19⅝” (64.5 x 50 cm.), Museum of Modern Art, NY. To the latter part of 1933 belong three portraits of the African dancer, Feral Benga, among them The Mask of Light.

— 5 days ago with 24 notes

#Pavel Tchelitchew  #The mask of light  #gouache on paper  #Russian  #surrealist  #painter  #artist  #Russian Artist  #New York Art  #Jazz Age  #Feral Benga  #art 
Untitled (Man in Blue Hat) by Roy DeCarava, color screenprint, 1945, Size Height 12.2 in.; Width 8.6 in. / Height 31.1 cm.; Width 21.9 cm.

Untitled (Man in Blue Hat) by Roy DeCarava, color screenprint, 1945, Size Height 12.2 in.; Width 8.6 in. / Height 31.1 cm.; Width 21.9 cm.

— 5 days ago with 3 notes

#Man in Blue Hat  #Untitled  #Roy DeCarava  #artist  #art  #screenprint  #American artist  #African - American  #African-American artists  #painter  #photographer  #The Harlem Renaissance  #the civil rights movement 
Lenox Avenue by Sargent Claude Johnson, 1935–43, Lithograph, 12 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (31.8 x 21.6 cm) sheet: 15 x 10 1/2 in. (38.1 x 26.7 cm)

Lenox Avenue by Sargent Claude Johnson, 1935–43, Lithograph, 12 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (31.8 x 21.6 cm) sheet: 15 x 10 1/2 in. (38.1 x 26.7 cm)

— 6 days ago with 70 notes

#Sargent Claude Johnson  #Lenox Avenue  #artist  #American  #African - American  #art  #Abstract Figurative  #Early Modern  #graphic artist  #sculptor  #painter  #ceramist  #printmaker  #The Harlem Renaissance 
Moon Masque by Loïs Mailou Jones, oil and collage on canvas, 1971, 41 x 30 1/8 in. (104.1 x 76.4 cm), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Bequest of the artist

Moon Masque by Loïs Mailou Jones, oil and collage on canvas, 1971, 41 x 30 1/8 in. (104.1 x 76.4 cm), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Bequest of the artist

— 6 days ago with 4 notes

#Moon Masque  #Loïs Mailou Jones  #American  #The Harlem Renaissance  #art  #African - American  #painter  #painting  #oil and collage on canvas  #Smithsonian American Art Museum  #Lois Mailou Jones  #abstract 
"My fear of life is necessary to me, as is my illness. Without anxiety and illness, I am a ship without a rudder. My art is grounded in reflections over being different from others. My sufferings are part of my self and my art. They are indistinguishable from me, and their destruction would destroy my art. I want to keep those sufferings."
Edvard Munch
— 6 days ago with 1 note

#Edvard Munch  #painter  #artist  #Norwegian  #quote 
"Art is a sense of magic."
— 1 week ago with 2 notes

#Art  #quote 
Wild by Ben Okri

Ben Okri is a prolific Booker-Prize winning novelist and essayist, but has published only two collections of poetry. The first was An African Elegy and the second was Mental Fight. Both were highly regarded. Thus a third collection is a literary event, especially since 13 years have elapsed since his last. As acclaimed for his poetic vision as for the beauty of his language, in these poems Okri captures both the tenderness and the fragility, as well as the depths and the often hidden directions of our lives. To him, the ‘wild’ is an alternative to the familiar; an essential place in the journey where energy meets freedom, where art meets the elemental, where chaos can be honed. The wild is our link to the stars…

Ranging across a wide variety of subjects, from the autobiographical to the philosophical, from war to love, from nature to the difficulty of truly seeing, these poems reconfigure the human condition in unusual light through their mastery of tone and condensed brilliance.

— 1 week ago with 3 notes

#Ben Okri  #Nigeria  #Nigerian poet  #poet  #poetry  #African Poetry  #Postmodernism  #post-colonial traditions  #magical realism  #Wild  #book  #Booker Prize 
O that Abstract Garden by Ben Okri

O that abstract garden of being
Tells me to be brave, and clear,
In the fire of living,
And in the journey through the year.
So I will grow me like an oak tree
And make life’s honey like a bee.
Each day I will walk an interesting mile
And with the sun I’ll share a smile.
I will play again like a child,
And celebrate what’s wild.
I will swim in every sea or river,
And reflect the light of the sublime giver.
I will be at ease with opposition,
And will cultivate intuition.
I will walk the surprising streets,
And dance to life’s unexpected beats.
I will notice all the phases of the moon
And try not to act too late or too soon.
I will write something new every day
And look at paintings in an alternative way.
I’ll not dream the same way twice;
But I’ll not be shy to repeat what’s nice.
I’ll have the courage, when needed, to change;
And I won’t forget that life is strange.
And so I’ll learn to love the simple things
As well as the complexity that life brings. 
Good or bad I’ll learn to treat the same
And I’ll not forget that it’s all a mysterious game.
I’ll not let that general fear of death run my life
And I’ll make magic even out of strife.
Into the higher realms I will enter
And make my corner the centre.
O that abstract garden, make me clear,
Make me brave, without fear.
I intend to love this rich new year.

Booker Prize-winning novelist and one of Britain’s foremost poets, Ben Okri is a passionate advocate of the written word. In A Time for New Dreams he breaks new ground in an unusual collection of linked essays, which address such diverse themes as childhood, self-censorship, the role of beauty, the importance of education and the real significance of the recent economic meltdown.

Proving that ‘true literature tears up the script’ of how we see ourselves, A Time for New Dreams is provocative and thought-provoking. In an intriguing marriage of style and content, the concise but perfectly formed essays in this collection push the parameters of writing whilst asking profound questions about who we are and the future that awaits us.

— 1 week ago with 1 note

#Ben Okri  #Nigeria  #Nigerian poet  #novelist  #writer  #poetry  #African Poetry  #A Time for New Dreams  #O that Abstract Garden  #magical realism  #post-colonial traditions  #Postmodernism  #Booker Prize 
"This earth that we live on is full of stories in the same way that, for a fish, the ocean is full of ocean. Some people say when we are born we’re born into stories. I say we’re also born from stories."
Ben Okri
— 1 week ago with 1 note

#Ben Okri  #Nigeria  #Nigerian poet  #novelist  #quote 
Untitled, H. 50, W. 72 inches (127 x 182.9 cm.), oil on canvas, 1978 by Norman Lewis.
Purchase, George A. Hearn Fund, by exchange, and The Eugene and Estelle Ferkauf Foundation Gift, 1991

Untitled, H. 50, W. 72 inches (127 x 182.9 cm.), oil on canvas, 1978 by Norman Lewis.

Purchase, George A. Hearn Fund, by exchange, and The Eugene and Estelle Ferkauf Foundation Gift, 1991

— 2 weeks ago

#Norman Lewis  #African-American painter  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #artist  #oil on canvas  #Untitled  #Bermudian descent  #abstract expressionism  #Spiral Group 
The Soul Never Dwells In A Dry Place, 1946, Oil on Masonite. h: 25 x w: 31 in / h: 63.5 x w: 78.7 cm by Romare Bearden (September 2, 1911 – March 12, 1988)

Every artist wants his work to be permanent. But what is? The Aswan Dam covered some of the greatest art in the world. Venice is sinking. Great books and pictures were lost in the Florence floods. In the meantime we still enjoy butterflies. - Romare Bearden

The Soul Never Dwells In A Dry Place, 1946, Oil on Masonite. h: 25 x w: 31 in / h: 63.5 x w: 78.7 cm by Romare Bearden (September 2, 1911 – March 12, 1988)

Every artist wants his work to be permanent. But what is? The Aswan Dam covered some of the greatest art in the world. Venice is sinking. Great books and pictures were lost in the Florence floods. In the meantime we still enjoy butterflies. - Romare Bearden

— 2 weeks ago with 1 note

#Romare Bearden  #African-American  #artist  #art  #oil  #masonite  #painting  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #abstract  #20th-century American painters  #writer