Hesi Underground

Ask me anything   Submit   Dreaming in Color: Art and Inspirations ~Beautiful things are not the subject of terms, it’s our observations, the perception… I am a stream of rushing river. I am a history of broken stone. I am great hope. I am form and matter. I am a source of energy. I am pure energy. I am the light sublunary. I am great wit’ all of my parts Ka Ach Ba! I am Me, Myself and I. I am aware. I am the conscious and the subconscious. I am the sincerest heart… I am love. The Prescene. Unity Divided. Me and I. Ka Ach Ba.
I am a creative who utilizes some medium that is at my disposal to translate my messages and the words are all weapons in my artistic arsenal...
My principal interests: African American literature and art, esp. Harlem Renaissance, African poetry and art, African and African American culture and art, ethnic art, primitive cultures, but also LGBT writing and art, independent film and musical stylings, Ancient Kemetic Culture, Nubian Culture; global human rights, including LGBTQ rights. Instagram #hesiunderground KIK: hesiunderground http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/hesi-glowacki.html  http://www.saatchiart.com/hesi artfinder.com/hesiglowacki

I Have Walked a Long Time by Sonia Sanchez

i have walked a long time
much longer than death that splinters
wid her innuendos.
my life, ah my alien life,
is like an echo of nostalgia
bringen blue screens to bury clouds
rinsen wite stones stretched among the sea.

you, man, will you remember me when i die?
will you stare and stain my death and say
i saw her dancen among swallows
far from the world’s obscenities?
you, man, will you remember and cry?

and i have not loved.
always
while the body prowls
the soul catalogues each step;
while the unconscious unbridles feasts
the flesh knots toward the shore.
ah, i have not loved
wid legs stretched like stalks against sheets
wid stomachs drainen the piracy of oceans
wid mouths discarden the gelatin
to shake the sharp self.
i have walked by memory of others
between the blood night
and twilights
i have lived in tunnels
and fed the bloodless fish;
between the yellow rain
and ash,
i have heard the rattle
of my seed,
so time, like some pearl necklace embracen
a superior whore, converges
and the swift spider binds my breast.

you, man, will you remember me when i die?
will you stare and stain my death and say
i saw her applauden suns
far from the grandiose audience?
you, man, will you remember and cry?

poem from Homegirls and Handgrenades (White Pine Press, 2007)
poem also part of Full Moon of Sonia CD

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— 1 week ago
#Sonia Sanchez  #poet  #poem  #poetry  #African American  #African American Writer  #African American Poet  #activist  #playwright  #Full Moon of Sonia  #I Have Walked a Long Time  #American Poet  #Black Arts Movement  #American Women's poetry 
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Carnival by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 20x24 inches, 2013

Carnival by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 20x24 inches, 2013

— 1 week ago with 27 notes
#Carnival  #Hesi Glowacki  #painter  #painting  #acrylic on canvas  #abstract  #abstract art  #abstract expressionism  #contemporary  #contemporary art  #artist  #artists on tumblr  #artfinder  #saatchi  #fineartamerica  #fine art 
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Creation by AARON DOUGLAS (1899 - 1979)  Oil on canvas board, 1969. 508x406 mm; 20x16 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right.  Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Daniels, Nashville, TN.  Exhibited: Aaron Douglas: A Private View Selections from the Daniels Collection, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN, October 24, 2003 – February 1, 2004; Berry-Hill Gallery, New York, with the label on the frame back.  This striking oil painting is an unusual example of a foray into abstraction by Aaron Douglas. Douglas had never completely crossed into abstraction like his peers Charles Alston and Hale Woodruff despite a modernist sensibility and his use of elements of Cubist design and geometric abstraction in his early painting. The concentric circles and tonal patterns Douglas employed as early as 1926 were innovative and strong indicators of his formal concerns. The earliest and best known example of his painterly abstraction is found in the oil on canvas, Birds in Flight, 1927. In 1973 Douglas recalled to David Driskell how “I wanted to create something new and modern that fitted in with Art Deco and the other things that were taking the country by storm. That is how I came upon the notion to use a number of things such as Cubism and a style with straight lines to emphasize the mathematical relationship of things.” Kinshasha Holman Conwill in her Frist Center exhibition essay points out that “though these smaller-scale paintings lack the monumentality of Douglas’s better-known murals, they affirm his enduring attraction to geometric abstraction.” In 1969, while Douglas had been retired from Fisk University for three years, he continued to paint and exhibit his artwork.

Creation by AARON DOUGLAS (1899 - 1979) 
Oil on canvas board, 1969. 508x406 mm; 20x16 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right.

Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Daniels, Nashville, TN. 
Exhibited: Aaron Douglas: A Private View Selections from the Daniels Collection, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN, October 24, 2003 – February 1, 2004; Berry-Hill Gallery, New York, with the label on the frame back.

This striking oil painting is an unusual example of a foray into abstraction by Aaron Douglas. Douglas had never completely crossed into abstraction like his peers Charles Alston and Hale Woodruff despite a modernist sensibility and his use of elements of Cubist design and geometric abstraction in his early painting. The concentric circles and tonal patterns Douglas employed as early as 1926 were innovative and strong indicators of his formal concerns. The earliest and best known example of his painterly abstraction is found in the oil on canvas, Birds in Flight, 1927. In 1973 Douglas recalled to David Driskell how “I wanted to create something new and modern that fitted in with Art Deco and the other things that were taking the country by storm. That is how I came upon the notion to use a number of things such as Cubism and a style with straight lines to emphasize the mathematical relationship of things.” Kinshasha Holman Conwill in her Frist Center exhibition essay points out that “though these smaller-scale paintings lack the monumentality of Douglas’s better-known murals, they affirm his enduring attraction to geometric abstraction.” In 1969, while Douglas had been retired from Fisk University for three years, he continued to paint and exhibit his artwork.

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#Aaron Douglas  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #artist  #art  #African American artist  #African American  #African Artist  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #Swann Galleries  #Abstract Composition  #abstract expressionism  #abstract  #painting  #cubism  #Creation 
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Your World by Georgia Douglas Johnson

Your world is as big as you make it.
I know, for I used to abide
In the narrowest nest in a corner,
My wings pressing close to my side.

But I sighted the distant horizon
Where the skyline encircled the sea
And I throbbed with a burning desire
To travel this immensity.

I battered the cordons around me
And cradled my wings on the breeze,
Then soared to the uttermost reaches
With rapture, with power, with ease!

— 2 weeks ago with 3 notes
#Georgia Douglas Johnson  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #poet  #poetry  #writer  #writing  #african american poet  #American Poet  #African American Poet  #Black Poetry  #playwright  #Fiction Writer  #African-American female poets  #Female Poet  #literature  #african american studies  #American Renaissance  #World Literature 
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Two Male Torsos, c. 1940 (black ‘African Torso’ and white ‘Untitled’) by Richmond Barthe, plaster composition with painted finish, White male verso inscribed, 13 H x 2 1/2 W x 3 D, base; 1/4 H x 3 1/2 W x 3 1/2 D, black male not inscribed, 12 1/2 H x 4 W x 2 1/2 D, base; 1 H x 3 1/4 W x 3 1/4 D

Mississippi - born artist Richmond Barthe (January 28, 1901 – March 5, 1989) was a pioneer in American Sculpture. A graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, he was a notable artist of the Harlem Renaissance and winner of many awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship. Barthe’s career had begun to flourish in the early 30’s and he was considered to be one of the leading ‘Moderns’ of the time, today his pieces are featured in leading museums such as the Whitney Museum of American art as well as the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of his most recognized American public works ‘Rose McClendon’ is installed at Frank Lloyd Wright designed, Fallingwater House in Western Pennsylvania.

— 2 weeks ago with 14 notes
#Richmond Barthé  #Richmond Barthe  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #gay artist  #gay art  #art  #sculpture  #sculptor  #male torso  #African American  #African American artist  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #James Richmond Barthé  #artist  #american artist  #Whitney Museum of American Art  #Metropolitan Museum of Art  #Pennsylvania Museum of Art  #Virginia Museum of Fine Arts  #LGBT African Americans  #LGBT 
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Luz Del Sol by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 31 inches, 2014

Luz Del Sol by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 31 inches, 2014

— 3 weeks ago with 7 notes
#Hesi Glowacki  #Luz Del Sol  #abstract  #abstraction  #abstract impressionism  #abstract expressionism  #lyrical abstraction  #contemporary art  #contemporary  #London artist  #London Art  #inspiration  #creative  #cubism 
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Untitled by Norman Lewis, oil on canvas, 1955. 635x1270 mm; 25x50 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right. 

 This nocturnal abstraction is a very good example of Norman Lewis’s important “black” paintings. Beginning in the late 1940s, Lewis painted at night, depicting what he saw from his studio window or on walks in Harlem. His 1950s “atmospheric” works, such as Orpheus from 1953 and this untitled painting, subsume the drawing and abstracted structures under the dark surface of “blackness.” These darker paintings are a counterpoint to his more celebrated works at the time, the lighter, ephemeral Migrating Birds of 1954 and Harlem Turns White of 1955. Another such “black” 1955 painting, Dark Horizon, was included in the 1995 Studio Museum in Harlem exhibition, Norman Lewis, Black Paintings, 1946-1977.

Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Oral Lovell, Wellesley, MA; thence by descent to the current owner. Oral Lovell was a significant collector of Norman Lewis’s works and was his close friend from 1959 to 1965. They met through a circle of New York City artists, including Romare Bearden and Charles Alston.

Untitled by Norman Lewis, oil on canvas, 1955. 635x1270 mm; 25x50 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right.

This nocturnal abstraction is a very good example of Norman Lewis’s important “black” paintings. Beginning in the late 1940s, Lewis painted at night, depicting what he saw from his studio window or on walks in Harlem. His 1950s “atmospheric” works, such as Orpheus from 1953 and this untitled painting, subsume the drawing and abstracted structures under the dark surface of “blackness.” These darker paintings are a counterpoint to his more celebrated works at the time, the lighter, ephemeral Migrating Birds of 1954 and Harlem Turns White of 1955. Another such “black” 1955 painting, Dark Horizon, was included in the 1995 Studio Museum in Harlem exhibition, Norman Lewis, Black Paintings, 1946-1977.

Provenance: acquired directly from the artist; Oral Lovell, Wellesley, MA; thence by descent to the current owner. Oral Lovell was a significant collector of Norman Lewis’s works and was his close friend from 1959 to 1965. They met through a circle of New York City artists, including Romare Bearden and Charles Alston.

— 3 weeks ago
#Norman Lewis  #Norman W. Lewis  #African American artist  #African American  #african-american  #African-American Painter  #teacher  #scholar  #Spiral group  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #black art  #Black Art  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance 
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Untitled (Abstract Composition) by Norman Lewis, oil on wood panel, 1947. 335x457 mm; 14x18 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right recto. Signed and inscribed.

By the fall of 1946, Lewis had begun a new series of urban abstracted forms, as found in Metropolitan Crowd in the Delaware Art Museum, and Twilight Sounds, 1947, in the St. Louis Museum of Art. This horizontal band of densely drawn figures is similar in composition to his paintings Crossing and his second Jazz Musicians, both of 1948, with their suggested Cubism.

Untitled (Abstract Composition) by Norman Lewis, oil on wood panel, 1947. 335x457 mm; 14x18 inches. Signed and dated in oil, lower right recto. Signed and inscribed.

By the fall of 1946, Lewis had begun a new series of urban abstracted forms, as found in Metropolitan Crowd in the Delaware Art Museum, and Twilight Sounds, 1947, in the St. Louis Museum of Art. This horizontal band of densely drawn figures is similar in composition to his paintings Crossing and his second Jazz Musicians, both of 1948, with their suggested Cubism.

— 3 weeks ago with 1 note
#Norman Lewis  #African-American painter  #African American artist  #teacher  #scholar  #abstract expressionism  #Norman W. Lewis  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral group  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #art  #artist  #artwork  #american art  #abstraction 
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In the manner of Rockwell Kent and his African American contemporaries working in the 1930s, this remarkable scene depicts a nude black male figure, overcome by a vision of angels — also black — in the nighttime sky. As in many of Kent’s and Marsden Hartley’s paintings, the landscape scene probably refers to the mountains of Maine. 

Looking Heavenward, oil on board, 23,75 x 27,05 inches, circa 1930s

In the manner of Rockwell Kent and his African American contemporaries working in the 1930s, this remarkable scene depicts a nude black male figure, overcome by a vision of angels — also black — in the nighttime sky. As in many of Kent’s and Marsden Hartley’s paintings, the landscape scene probably refers to the mountains of Maine.

Looking Heavenward, oil on board, 23,75 x 27,05 inches, circa 1930s

— 3 weeks ago with 12 notes
#Looking Heavenward  #Rockwell Kent  #Marsden Hartley  #African American  #black male  #nude male  #Maine  #art  #painting  #1930s  #1930  #african  #African Male  #modern art  #artwork  #oil painting  #oil on board 
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Sonnet by James Baldwin

Go away and let me rest in peace 
 Thou restless, ruthless, ever-searching Mind. 
 Why is it that you come, and never cease 
 To tear apart each refuge that I find? 
 I had thought that I could come and hide 
 Far from the bitter battle fray 
 But you have come and waked the country-side 
 And put an end to my complacent day.

Tell me, may I never hope to see 
 Some blessed refuge from the bruising rain? 
 I thought that this was it, and I would be 
 Forever sheltered from this roving Brain. 
 But now I must depart—my peace is o’er 
 For you have forced my barricaded door.

Winter, 1942


*The Magpie Sings the Great Depression: Selections from DeWitt Clinton High School’s Literary Magazine, 1929-1942
*James Baldwin, 1955 picture by Carl Van Vechten

Sonnet by James Baldwin

Go away and let me rest in peace
Thou restless, ruthless, ever-searching Mind.
Why is it that you come, and never cease
To tear apart each refuge that I find?
I had thought that I could come and hide
Far from the bitter battle fray
But you have come and waked the country-side
And put an end to my complacent day.

Tell me, may I never hope to see
Some blessed refuge from the bruising rain?
I thought that this was it, and I would be
Forever sheltered from this roving Brain.
But now I must depart—my peace is o’er
For you have forced my barricaded door.

Winter, 1942


*The Magpie Sings the Great Depression: Selections from DeWitt Clinton High School’s Literary Magazine, 1929-1942
*James Baldwin, 1955 picture by Carl Van Vechten

— 3 weeks ago with 3 notes
#James Baldwin  #poet  #poetry  #Portrait of James Baldwin  #novelist  #essayist  #writer  #Black Writers  #Black Writer  #African American  #african american studies  #Sonnet by James Baldwin  #Sonnet  #The Magpie  #Carl Van Vechten 
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The place in which I’ll fit will not exist until I make it. ― James Baldwin

The place in which I’ll fit will not exist until I make it. ― James Baldwin

— 3 weeks ago with 60 notes
#James Baldwin  #quote  #african american poet  #african american studies  #novelist  #essayist  #social critic  #writer  #Black Writers  #Portrait of James Baldwin 
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Dark Rapture (James Baldwin) by Beauford Delaney, 1941, oil on canvas or board, 34 x 28 inches

James Baldwin by Beauford Delaney, 1963, Pastel on Paper, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute

Portrait of James Baldwin by Beauford Delaney, 1945. Oil on canvas. 22 x 18 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art

Portrait of James Baldwin by Beauford Delaney, 1965, oil on canvas, 25.5 by 21.25 inches, signed lower left.

— 3 weeks ago with 156 notes
#Beauford Delaney  #painter  #American modernist painter  #Harlem Renaissance  #The Harlem Renaissance  #portrait  #James Baldwin  #nude male  #portrait of a man  #painting  #art  #artist  #black portraiture  #Black Art  #African American artist  #American painter  #Portrait of James Baldwin  #Dark Rapture (James Baldwin)  #Dark Rapture 
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"Know from whence you came. If you know whence you came, there are absolutely no limitations to where you can go."
James Baldwin
— 3 weeks ago with 6 notes
#James Baldwin  #novelist  #essayist  #poet  #writer  #playwright  #social critic  #Black Writers  #quote  #quotes 
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“I’m intensely interested in space, form, color, the things that challenge all contemporary artists. It would be wonderful if I could just sit back and do it esthetically. But, I have to react to the other thing. I’m part of it, I have no choice. I think I’ve gotten to the point where it isn’t satisfying to do another handsome, decorative abstraction. Painting has become so impersonal. I have a need to relate to humanity in a more direct way.”

African Theme # 1 by Charles Alston, oil on canvas, circa 1950 (First in African Theme series)
African Theme #2 by Charles Alston, 36.12 X 27 in (91.74 X 68.58 cm), oil on canvas, circa 1950
Untitled (African Theme) by Charles Alston, oil on canvas. 20 x 16 in., circa 1952

— 1 month ago with 3 notes
#Charles Alston  #Charles Henry Alston  #Charles H. Alston  #The Harlem Renaissance  #Harlem Renaissance  #art  #artist  #artwork  #abstract  #abstract figurative  #abstraction  #spiral  #Spiral group  #Spiral (arts alliance)  #Spiral: Perspectives on an African-American Art Collective  #muralist  #teacher  #painter  #oil on canvas  #oil painting  #illustrator  #sculptor  #black art  #Black Art  #Black Artist  #african american  #African American  #African Theme 2  #African Theme  #Untitled (African Theme) 
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Lost but Still (Abstraction) by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 31 inches, 2014

Lost but Still (Abstraction) by Hesi Glowacki, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 31 inches, 2014

— 1 month ago with 20 notes
#art  #abstract  #acrylic  #abstract expressionism  #lyrical abstraction  #contemporary art  #contemporary artist  #london  #artist  #Hesi Glowacki  #acrylic on canvas  #painting  #painter  #artwork  #contemporary 
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